The NSC Field School – ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute

No Comments

Applications for the NSC 2018 Field School are now open. Deadline is April 8, details in the link below.

The Field School will include numerous site visits and lectures in East Java. It will focus on the ancient polity of Majapahit (ca 13th-15th centuries CE). Participants will conduct intensive archaeological and art historical research as well as heritage management at Mount Penanggunan, Trawas, Mojokerto, East Java.

Penanggungan is regarded as one of the most sacred mountains in Java, identified with the summit of Mt Mahāmeru during the Hindu-Buddhist period. Well over 100 archaeological sites, comprising terraced sanctuaries, cave hermitages, bathing places and the remnants of religious communities, have been discovered on its slopes. These historical remains represent the ‘classical age’ of East Javanese art, spanning the 10th to 16th century. The majority of these structures were apparently constructed during the Majapahit period (ca. 1360–1511), thereby contributing to a broader understanding of the cultural dynamics of the so-called ‘age of transition’ in Javanese history.

The Field School maintains a unique full-spectrum approach designed to introduce participants to research design, methodology, field skills, excavation, analysis, and presentation.

The 2018 Field School is a collaboration between the Nalanda–Sriwijaya Centre (NSC), ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute (ISEAS), Singapore; and Pusat Penelitian Arkeologi Nasional (ARKENAS; National Centre for Archaeological Research), Indonesia. It will be hosted at the Ubaya Penanggungan Center, Trawas East Java.

Hélène Njoto (ISEAS) and Bambang Budi Utomo (ARKENAS) will lead the Field School.

Source: The NSC Field School – ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute

Training in Thin-Section Petrography for Use in Archaeological Ceramic Studies

No Comments

Training opportunity for Thin-Section Petrography in ceramics studies. Deadline is 26 Janaury 2018:

Notice of Workshop at the Angkor Ceramics Unit
Training in Thin-Section Petrography for Use in Archaeological Ceramic Studies
5 – 9 March, 2018
Siem Reap, Cambodia

This workshop is designed for Southeast Asian practicing archaeologists and advanced students engaged in the study of ceramics and excavation of ceramic kilns. Led by two experienced senior specialists, the workshop will convey knowledge of the techniques and uses of polarized light microscopy of ceramics and stone, known as thin-section petrography, and standard ceramic engineering tests of sherds and raw materials.

The program will take place from Monday 5 March through Friday 9 March 2018 in Siem Reap, Cambodia, at the Angkor Ceramics Unit. The Angkor Ceramics Unit stores and studies ceramics excavated from kiln sites in Greater Angkor. In 2015 it was declared an official component of the Angkor International Center for Research and Documentation, a division of the Apsara Authority (Authority for the Protection of the Site and Management of the Region of Angkor), with the official endorsement of UNESCO.

The workshop will consist of a hands-on short course on thin-section petrographic analysis of archaeological ceramics, together with hands-on observation and testing of the structure (optical microscopy, chemical tests), composition (pXRF) and properties of sherds and raw materials.Participants will gain skills in low-cost but highly effective methods for identifying the mineralogical constituents of ceramic materials, discerning variability in materials, and relating that variability to differences in geological or archaeological sources and to ceramic technologies. A focus on the specific nature of Cambodian materials is a distinguishing feature of the workshop.

The primary workshop instructors will be Dr. Chandra L. Reedy, Professor in the Center for Historic Architecture and Design and Director of the Laboratory for Analysis of Cultural Materials, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA; and Dr. Pamela B. Vandiver, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Co-Director, Program in Heritage Conservation Science, and Adjunct Professor, School of Anthropology in Archaeology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

The workshop is organised by H. E. Tan Boun Suy and Dr. Ea Darith of the Angkor International Center for Research and Documentation, Apsara Authority, and Louise Cort, curator for ceramics, Freer|Sackler, Smithsonian Institution. Financial support is provided by the Luce Foundation and the Friends of Khmer Culture.

The workshop is open to 16 practicing archaeologists and advanced students—8 from Cambodia and 8 from other countries in Southeast Asia. Travel assistance, accommodation, food, and limited per diem will be provided.

Applications should be received no later than Friday 26 January 2018. Successful applicants will be advised by email.

APPLICATION

Please submit your application in English by email to Dr. Ea Darith, eadarith@yahoo.com and Louise Cort, cortlo@si.edu. Please provide the following information:

  1. Name (family name in capital letters)
  2. Age, gender
  3. Email address
  4. Home postal address
  5. Institutional affiliation
  6. Name of person to whom you are responsible (such as supervisor or head of department) and that person’s email address
  7. Proposed means of travel to and from your home base and Siem Reap, and estimate of costs
  8. Summary of education (degrees and dates) and previous experience in field archaeology and the study of archaeological ceramics
  9. Brief statement of current research and research interests. Please add citations to your reports and publications, if applicable.

Thank you from the workshop team.

Hoi An Field School Call for Expressions of Interest

No Comments

VMAP, in association with the Institute of Archaeology (Vietnam) and Flinders University, will conduct a two week terrestrial and maritime-based maritime archaeology field school in Jan/Feb 2018. Fieldwork will take place in the World Heritage Areas at Hue and Hoi An and the Marine Protected Area at Cu Lao Cham and will include a visit to the World Heritage Area at My Son. Accommodation will be at the Bach Dang Hotel in Hoi An.

Dates
Sat 26 / Sun 27 January to Sat 10 / Sun 11 Feb 2018. Dates are fixed.

Activities

1. Marine geophysics training and usage project (boat-based, non-diving)
– Side-scan sonar, magnetometer and ROV training and use at Cu Lao Cham.
2. SCUBA Diving project (boat-based, SCUBA diving)
Recording on the shipwreck site at Bai Ong and diving on targets found using maritime geophysics equipment
3. Cannon recording project in Hue (terrestrial, non-diving)
– 3D modeling, drawing, photography and cataloguing of the Dutch shipwreck cannons located in Hue.
4. Traditional boat building recording project (terrestrial, non-diving)
– 3D modeling, drawing, photography and cataloguing of traditional style Bau boats built by the master boat builders of Kim Bong village near Hoi An.

SCUBA diving certification is not required.

Language of instruction: English

Requirements:

Masters students at Flinders University may be eligible for funding of $2,000 under the Asia Postgraduate Programme scheme (conditions apply). Students at other universities should contact Mark Polzer for further information Mark.Polzer@flinders.edu.au

All participants will be expected to arrange and pay for their visa for Vietnam as well as travel insurance and their own airfares to and from Da Nang in Vietnam (Approximate cost AUD$800).

Participant Fee: US$1,000, AUD$ 1,200 or 800 Euros. This fee will be used to cover on-the-ground expenses such as ground transportation, food and accommodation as well as making a contribution towards the fieldwork costs.

Potential participants should send an email expression of interest that includes the following information: Name, email address, a photocopy of the information page of your passport and a brief (half page) cv or biography to:
Mark.staniforth@flinders.edu.au

For more information contact: Mark.staniforth@flinders.edu.au

Fieldwork Opportunity: Unearthing the ancient secrets of Angkor in Cambodia

4 Comments

How would you like a chance in excavating Angkor Wat in 2018? Two of my friends and colleagues, Miriam Stark and Alison Carter are opening up fieldwork opportunities through the Earthwatch Institute; it is a pay-to-volunteer programme, with the proceeds used to fund the excavation.

The civilization of Angkor was long believed to have collapsed, but recent evidence suggests that the people continued living sustainably in the Angkor region after the empire collapsed and the capital moved south. What can we learn about dramatic changes that occurred in their society by studying their daily lives?

Much is known about the kings who ruled the Angkorian Empire from the 9th to 15th centuries, but far less is known about their subjects: the people who lived and worked during this time period and the following the post-Angkorian period (15-17th centuries CE), the so-called “non-elites.”

Previous archaeological work by the Greater Angkor Project suggests that these communities survived political conflicts from rival kingdoms and multiple periods of drought and flooding. We still know far more about Angkor’s rulers than about their subjects. What were their home lives like? How did they manage sustainable households under such climactic and socio-political challenges? Why did they stay after the political capital moved south?

By studying the remains of households, scientists hope to solve some of these mysteries. Join them on this novel archaeological expedition in the quest to uncover the answers to how the Khmer people endured in the face of these obstacles.

Source: Unearthing the ancient secrets of Angkor in Cambodia

Singapore-Cambodia Koh Ker Field School

No Comments

Applications are open for the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre Field School in Koh Ker, scheduled for December.

Koh Ker, Prasat Thom

Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre Archaeological Field School 2015
02-22 Dec 2015

Applications are being sought from students interested in pursuing a three week intensive program focused on culture, heritage and archaeology in Cambodia. The Field School will begin in Phnom Penh and conclude in Singapore. Students will participate in lectures, field training (survey, excavations, local respondent interviews), analysis, and site visits. Students will produce a final report and group presentation. Partial lodging and travel subsidies will be provided for 10 applicants (subject to change).

Applicants for the Field School should be enrolled in a postgraduate program or be in their final year of undergraduate study. Preferred fields of specialization include: archaeology, anthropology, heritage and culture, history, art history, and museum studies. Applicants should be citizens of East Asia Summit (EAS) countries. The 18 East Asia Summit countries are: Australia, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam. Language of instruction: English.

Full details here.

photo by:

Applications open for the 2013 German-Cambodian Conservation School

No Comments

An opportunity for museum professionals in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam to get training in museum conservation techniques.

Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, Phnom Penh

Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, Phnom Penh

In co-operation with the German Archaeological Institute, the German Apsara Conservation Project and the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz, the GCCS organizes 6-weeks-courses for two participants per course in restoration and conservation of archaeological objects. During the first 5 weeks, the participants get to know the basics in bronze, iron and ceramic conservation in the lab of the Memot Centre. The leading teacher is Ms Seng Sonetra assisted by Mr Tuy Sophea. Then the participants change to Angkor Vat where the team of Prof. Hans Leisen gives a 1-week introduction in stone conservation techniques.

More details here.