Priest faces raps for Molo convent renovation

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Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

via Panay News, 05 Sep 2018: Unauthorised renovations made on a century-old church in the Philippines.

Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

Molo Church, Iloilo City. Source: Panay News, 05 Sep 2018

The Sangguniang Panlungsod’s (SP) committee on tourism and cultural affairs has recommended the filing of charges against Monsignor Maurillo Silva, administrator of St. Anne Parish in Molo district for the unauthorized renovation of the Molo Church’s convent.

The charges could be for violation of Republic Act 10066 (National Cultural Heritage Act of 2009) and the National Building Code, among others, according to the committee chaired by Councilor Candice Tupas.

Source: Priest faces raps for Molo convent renovation

[Scholarship] Infants and ill-health in the bioarchaeological record

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PhD scholarship opportunity from the University of Otago. Closing date is 23 September 2018.

There has been a recent surge of interest in modeling the social, economic, and emotional investment in care provision for the physically disabled in the palaeopathological literature. Human infants are born in an extreme state of helplessness and have a lengthy development phase compared with all other primates. Their immature state means that they require significant care for survival, arguably as time intensive and specialised as caring for individuals with severe health-related disabilities. However, there is very little exploration of the implications that infant and childcare has for past society. This thesis will explore stress and disease in infants and children in prehistoric Southeast Asia, and build a new theoretical model that assesses the social implications of care by assessing factors of infant and maternal health, fertility, infant feeding practices, and family and social structure.

Source: Infants and ill-health in the bioarchaeological record: who cares?, Research opportunities, Otago Medical School, University of Otago, New Zealand

[Paper] Portable X-ray fluorescence analysis of ceramic covered boxes from the 12th/13th-century Java Sea Shipwreck

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via Journal of Archaeological Science Reports: Portable XRF analysis of Qingbai from the Java Sea Shipwreck.

Forty-one ceramic boxes from the twelfth- or thirteenth-century Java Sea Shipwreck were analyzed at the Elemental Analysis Facility at Chicago’s Field Museum using nondestructive portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF). Twenty-two samples have a qingbai-type glaze and nineteen are painted ware with painted black decorations originally covered by a lead-based green glaze. The goals of the analysis were to (1) test whether visually similar ceramics shared similar elemental compositions; (2) identify ceramics that might have been made at different kiln sites (or from different paste recipes); and (3) determine if compositional groups in the ceramic dataset differentiated using PXRF are archaeologically meaningful. Based on this study, although PXRF can be successfully used to some degree to differentiate between different groups of qingbai-type ceramics, more research needs to be done on its applicability to painted ware pastes.

Source: Portable X-ray fluorescence analysis of ceramic covered boxes from the 12th/13th-century Java Sea Shipwreck: A preliminary investigation – ScienceDirect

Archaeologists to sue Bagan management committee

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Lawyer U Phoe Phyu discusses the lawsuit at a press confreence in Yangon on Tuesday. Source: Myanmar Times, 05 Sep 2018

via Myanmar Times, 05 September 2018: The Myanmar Archaeology Association files a lawsuit against the Mandalay government over what it describes as mismanagement of the Bagan heritage area.

Lawyer U Phoe Phyu discusses the lawsuit at a press confreence in Yangon on Tuesday. Source: Myanmar Times, 05 Sep 2018

Lawyer U Phoe Phyu discusses the lawsuit at a press confreence in Yangon on Tuesday. Source: Myanmar Times, 05 Sep 2018

The Myanmar Archaeology Association will sue the Bagan Management Committee for mismanagement of the Bagan heritage site in Mandalay Region, the association’s secretary has said.

The association will send a letter through a law firm to Nyaung U district court this week. The court will look into the accusations, and hearings on the matter are expected to take about two months, said U Thu Ra Aung, the association’s secretary.

Source: Archaeologists to sue Bagan management committee | The Myanmar Times

Digital engineering of Thai archaeological sites

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Source: MGROnline, 04 September 2018

via MGROnline, 04 September 2018: Research project by a team from King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi to conduct 3D scanning of Thai archaeological ruins and materials conservation. Article is in Thai.

Source: MGROnline, 04 September 2018

Source: MGROnline, 04 September 2018

Source: เผยฐานข้อมูลวิศวกรรม บูรณะโบราณสถานใกล้เคียงของเดิม

[Talk] The Enigma Of Hindu-Buddhist Art In Ancient Kedah

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Readers in Kuala Lumpur may be interested in this talk about the Bujang Valley archaeological sites by Dr Nasha bin Rodziadi Khaw on 22 September. The talk will be held at ILHAM, a public art gallery.

The Bujang Valley has seen the discovery of archaeological remains that are believed to be related to the port of Ancient Kedah. Historical accounts and archaeological discoveries show that the area functioned as a trading point as well as a centre for iron production from the 2nd to 14th Century C.E. A significant number of artefacts relevant to Hindu-Buddhist art were also found, such as sculptures, shrines and inscriptions. Issues regarding the cultural origin of those remains, and questions of whether or not they were commissioned and made locally remain ambiguous. This presentation by Nasha Khaw will discuss the form and function of Hindu-Buddhist remains from Ancient Kedah, past opinions by scholars on their cultural origin, and present theories based on recent scholarship.

Source: The Enigma Of Hindu-Buddhist Art In Ancient Kedah: A Historical Discourse | ILHAM Kuala Lumpur

100-year-old steamship found in Thai waters

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Rayong streamship window. Source: Ministry of Culture Thailand

via Thairath, 03 September 2018: News reports of a 100-year-old steamship found in the waters of Rayong. The shipwreck is not a new discovery – but there are some interesting pictures of the finds. There is a particularly interesting account by a diver saying that no fisherman or diver go near the site for fear of the paranormal. The article is in Thai.

Rayong streamship window. Source: Ministry of Culture Thailand

Rayong streamship window. Source: Ministry of Culture Thailand

Source: ตะลึง! นักโบราณคดี พบเรือกลไฟ 100 ปี จมใต้ทะเลระยอง

[Talk] Writing as a Marker of Identity in Early South and Southeast Asia

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Readers in Singapore may be interested in this talk by Prof. Himanshu Prabha Ray at the National University of Singapore on 12 September.

‘DEFINING TRANSNATIONAL MARITIME CULTURAL HERITAGE: WRITING AS A MARKER OF IDENTITY IN EARLY SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA’
Speaker: Prof Himanshu Prabha Ray (Anneliese Maier Fellow, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich)
Date: Wednesday, 12 September 2018
Time: 4:00pm – 5:30pm
Venue: AS8, Level 6, Conference Room (06-46)

Within the narrative of terrestrial histories of nation states, accounts of maritime cultural heritage often become an extension of land-based concerns. A paradigm shift to understanding the history of the sea destabilizes linear mapping of time and chronologies of political dynasties, empires and trading activity that helped sustain the quest for luxuries. This shift entails re-establishing the centrality of the sea and viewing it not only as a space permitting movement, but as a site of cultural encounters and shared experiences, as expressed through the medium of writing in a common script, i.e. the Brahmi script. The languages expressed were diverse and included Sanskrit, Prakrit, Tamil and Sinhala, as evident from inscriptions on pots recovered in South and Southeast Asia. In this presentation I revisit sites along the east coast of India and investigate maritime networks across Bay of Bengal as indicated by the presence of inscribed pottery recorded in archaeological investigations. An important marker of the interconnectedness of sites extending from lower Bengal to coastal Sri Lanka is the Rouletted Ware, first identified at the well-known site of Arikamedu on the Tamil coast and described by Mortimer Wheeler in 1946 as an indicator of Roman trade. In recent years, not only has Rouletted Ware been found in coastal Malaysia, Thailand, Java, Bali and Vietnam, but rigorous analysis of Tissamaharama in Sri Lanka has helped define its date from 2nd and 3rd century BCE to 1st century BCE. It is also evident that many Rouletted Ware pots were inscribed and continued in circulation for a longer period. Here I will primarily focus on patterns of use/distribution of inscribed pottery in an attempt to emphasise both temporal and spatial variations of cultural contacts across South and Southeast Asia and the extent to which writing was used as a marker of identity in maritime Asia in the centuries around the Common Era. The larger issue being addressed is the circulation of knowledge across the seas and the agency responsible for these circuits. Can these complexities be accommodated as Outstanding Universal Values that can underwrite transnational cultural routes to be nominated for World Heritage status?

Source: ‘Defining Transnational Maritime Cultural Heritage: Writing as a Marker of Identity in early South and Southeast Asia’ (Wednesday, 12 September 2018) – Southeast Asian Studies @ NUS

India signs MOU with Cambodia To Restore Preah Vihear

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via The Times of India, 29 August 2018:

India on Wednesday signed an MoU with Cambodia to help the Southeast Asian nation on restoration and preservation of an ancient Lord Shiva temple, a world heritage site.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed after external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj held wide-ranging talks with her Cambodian counterpart Prak Sokhonn.

The temple in remote Preah Vihear, which is also known as the ‘Temple of Preah Vihear’, dates back to the first half of the 11th century AD.

Source: India to help Cambodia renovate Lord Shiva temple