An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

via Merchant Machine, 19 May 2018: Trade routes of the world in the 11th and 12th centuries, including Southeast Asia!

Map created by reddit user martinjanmansson. Click to zoom in. The map above is probably the most detailed map of Medieval Trade Routes in Europe, Asia and Africa in the 11th and 12th centuries you can find online. It includes major and minor locations, major and minor routes, sea routes, canals

Source: An Incredibly Detailed Map Of Medieval Trade Routes

[Job] Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in Humanities at Waseda University

Waseda Institute for Advanced Study (WIAS) was established in September 2006 to enable promising and talented researchers to focus on their research activities under fixed-term contracts in a rich research environment. Around 40 researchers have been working on advanced research in a wide range of themes and with no limitation as to field of study. The Institute is currently recruiting researchers for AY2019 as detailed below.

Recruitment Fields
Fields corresponding to Humanities

Position
Assistant Professor (without tenure) or Associate Professor (without tenure)

Period of Appointment
Three years from the date of appointment.

In principle, the start date is April 1, 2019.

Application Qualifications
Persons with a doctorate. It is desirable for the doctorate to have been obtained within 10 years of April 1, 2019
Persons who expect to obtain a doctorate by April 1, 2019
Persons with scholarly attainment equivalent to persons who have obtained a doctorate as of April 1, 2019, and who have research experience at a research institution

Source: Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in Humanities at Waseda University

[Paper] Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory

A paper published in Science analyses the genomes of ancient Southeast Asian DNA and detected three distinct waves of migration into Southeast Asia beginning with hunter-gatherers around 45,000 years ago, followed by the Neolithic and the introduction of agricultural practices some 4,500 years ago, and a migration associated with the Bronze age, which reached Myanmar 3,000 years ago, Vietnam 2,000 years ago and Thailand in the last 1,000 years.

Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory
Science 17 May 2018:
DOI: 10.1126/science.aat3188

Southeast Asia is home to rich human genetic and linguistic diversity, but the details of past population movements in the region are not well known. Here, we report genome-wide ancient DNA data from eighteen Southeast Asian individuals spanning from the Neolithic period through the Iron Age (4100–1700 years ago). Early farmers from Man Bac in Vietnam exhibit a mixture of East Asian (southern Chinese agriculturalist) and deeply diverged eastern Eurasian (hunter-gatherer) ancestry characteristic of Austroasiatic speakers, with similar ancestry as far south as Indonesia providing evidence for an expansive initial spread of Austroasiatic languages. By the Bronze Age, in a parallel pattern to Europe, sites in Vietnam and Myanmar show close connections to present-day majority groups, reflecting substantial additional influxes of migrants.

Source: Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory | Science

See also:

[Job]: Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology)

Application deadline is 10 June 2018. Details and link below.

Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) (Fixed Term) in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.
The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA) is one of the nine University of Cambridge Museums and Botanic Garden (UCM). It is a sub-Department of the University Department of Social Anthropology and is a key resource for University teaching and research, particularly in collaboration with the Departments of Social Anthropology and Archaeology. Its world-class collections attract visiting researchers from all over the world and it maintains an active programme of temporary exhibitions and loans to major exhibitions within the UK and internationally. MAA’s collections are Designated for their national and international importance. For further information about the Museum’s staff, collections, and programmes, see www.maa.cam.ac.uk.

The Museum has embarked on a partnership with the Cambridge Rivers Project, aimed at researching and making accessible the extensive collections of artefacts from Asia for which it cares. Approximately 80,000 artefacts, 50,000 photographs and a rich documentary archive chart Cambridge’s role in archaeological and anthropological research across the continent, from the 1880s and through the twentieth century. The stories they contain are of importance to communities, scholars and publics worldwide as well as in Britain, illuminating the diversity of human experience and creativity, as well as complex shared histories of cross-cultural encounter that MAA is committed to telling. For more information on the Cambridge Rivers Project and its activities, see www.cambridgerivers.com

To support this project, MAA is seeking to appoint a full-time Collections Assistant (Asian Anthropology) for one year to work with Senior Curator for Anthropology Dr Mark Elliott, Collections Manager for Anthropology Rachel Hand, and researchers from the Cambridge Rivers Project to document, photograph and research collections from East, Southeast and South Asia, predominantly in the anthropology collections. The role will involve facilitating research access and supporting the work of the Cambridge Rivers Project, maintaining appropriate standards of documentation and collections care, and carrying out research to improve knowledge of the collections.

The successful candidate will have an understanding of and interest in museum collections with a background in Asian anthropology, archaeology or a related discipline, and demonstrated experience of object research. Knowledge of a relevant language is desirable. S/he will have very good IT skills including spreadsheets and basic word processing and experience with collections management systems. Excellent attention to detail and very good written and verbal communication skills are essential as well as excellent organisational skills and the ability to work independently and as part of a team.

Source: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/17533/

Call for Papers: Naditira Widya Journal

NADITIRA WIDYA adalah salah satu media publikasi Balai Arkeologi Kalimantan Selatan hasil penelitian dan pengembangan arkeologi berupa buah pikiran penulis dan warisan budaya

Submission guidelines here: https://naditirawidya.kemdikbud.go.id/index.php/nw/announcement/view/2

The three words that solved an 800-year-old shipwreck mystery

via News.com.au, 17 May 2018: Chinese inscription provides evidence for a new date to the Java Sea Shipwreck.

AN 800-year-old piece of pottery has helped archaeologists put together fascinating new details about a medieval ship that sank off the coast of Indonesia.

Source: The three words that solved an 800-year-old shipwreck mystery

Revisiting the date of the Java Sea Shipwreck from Indonesia
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2018.04.002

In this article we draw on suites of new information to reinterpret the date of the Java Sea Shipwreck. The ship was a Southeast Asian trading vessel carrying a large cargo of Chinese ceramics and iron as well as luxury items from outside of China, such as elephant tusks and resin. Initially the wreck, which was recovered in Indonesia, was placed temporally in the mid- to late 13th century based on a single radiocarbon sample and ceramic styles. We employ new data, including multiple radiocarbon dates and inscriptions found on some of the ceramics, to suggest that an earlier chronological placement be considered.

See also:

CFP: Global Jars: Asian Containers as Transcultural Enclosures

Global Jars: Asian Containers as Transcultural Enclosures
Academy of Visual Arts
Hong Kong Baptist University

September 8-9, 2018

Few objects are as universal, ubiquitous and multi-functional as a jar. The term ‘jar’ refers to any man-made shape with the capacity to enclose something, and hence jars are part of human experience throughout time and space, regardless of whether they contain matter or a void, food or drink, life-giving medicine or the ashes of the deceased. Yet, as ubiquitous as such containers, storage vessels, urns, and other kinds of jars might be, they may have been studied by archaeologists and anthropologists, but so far remained almost invisible to the eye of the (art) historian. This conference, entitled ‘Global Jars: Asian Containers as Transcultural Enclosures’, aims to make jars of all kinds visible in a variety of spatial contexts.

We invite proposals for papers to be presented at this conference to be held on the campus of Hong Kong Baptist University, Academy of Visual Arts, September 8-9, 2018.

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary team of scholars in the fields of ceramic studies, history and art history to approach the topic of the jar from multiple perspectives. Contributors are invited to consider jars not only as (household) utensils and evidence of lost or present human civilizations but also as artefacts in their own right, as culturally and aesthetically defined crafted goods and as objects charged with spiritual meanings and ritual significance. They understand jars not only as belonging to a single place, but as global or transcultural artefacts in which different cultures meet and merge. The goal is furthermore to examine jars not only as ceramic containers, but as materializing a boundary between inside and outside, content and environment, exterior worlds and interior enclosures; jars not only as things in the hands of makers, users, and collectors, but, in some cases, as understood to possess human-like agency, animalistic or other-worldly powers themselves.

This conference uses art-historical methods to understand jars as transcultural containers that mediate between inside and outside, Asian and non-Asian, local and global, this-worldly and other-worldly realms. Special attention will be given to the relationships between the filling, emptying and re-filling of jars with a variety of contents through time and throughout space and the charging, eliminating and re-charging of these particular objects with different sets of meanings.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the conference should send a proposal of 300 words accompanied by a bio note of 150 words (in one document) as an e-mail attachment to globaljars@hkbu.edu.hk.

Proposal deadline: June 1, 2018.

Selected participants will be notified by June 19, 2018. Final papers are due August 9, 2018.

A substantial contribution to travel costs to Hong Kong and lodging for all speakers during the conference will be provided.

Dr. Anna Katharina Grasskamp

Research Assistant Professor
ACADEMY OF VISUAL ARTS
Hong Kong Baptist University
CVA314, Communication and Visual Arts Building Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong

Associate Member
Cluster of Excellence Asia and Europe in a Global Context at Heidelberg University
Karl Jaspers Centre for Advanced Transcultural Studies
Voßstr. 2, Building 4400
69115 Heidelberg
Germany

Discovering historic Thon Buri

via Bangkok Post, 17 May 2018: Don’t forget! If you want to find out more about the archaeology of old Bangkok, Dr Kannika Sutheeratanaphirom (mentioned in the article) is giving a talk at the Siam Society tomorrow.

To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the establishment of Thon Buri as the former Thai capital last year, the Fine Arts Department has been conserving the old walls and moat of Thon Buri. It recently made public its findings about newly discovered archaeological sites in Bangkok, some of which are already tourist attractions.

Source: Discovering historic Thon Buri