You searched for "traditional trade". Here are the results:

[Talk] Learning from Ancient and Modern Trade in the Spice Islands of Eastern Island Southeast Asia

No Comments

Prof Peter Lape will be talking about his work in the eastern Indonesian islands at UCLA on Wednesday.

In historical times between the 16th and 20th centuries, the so-called spice islands of what is now eastern Indonesia were a zone of intensive interisland and long distance maritime trade. Archaeological evidence suggests that this interaction intensity has a relatively long history, dating to the early Neolithic period 3,500 years ago. Today, the large and small islands in this area remains intensively interconnected, and some of this trade is done by people using traditional boats operating under sail or paddle. This paper will explore how we can apply data from these different realms (documentary history, archaeology and ethnography) to expand our understanding of island connectivity at different times in the past and present, with implications for the future.

Source: Learning from Ancient and Modern Trade in the Spice Islands of Eastern Island Southeast Asia

New Bagan guide map in the works

No Comments

Bagan Tourism Development and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) are working on a new tourist map of Bagan.

“The map will show visitors where they can relax by the river, enjoy beautiful sceneries and find villages with traditional trades and crafts.

“The map will show them where they can enjoy the scenery without having to climb pagodas,” she said last Thursday.

Source: New Bagan guide map in the works

Categories: Burma (Myanmar) Tourism

Tags:

Megaliths of the Kelabit Highlands

No Comments
Batu Kalong

via Kuching In and Out:

Batu Kalong

Highlands is possibly an ancient and, at the same time, a continuous one. Recent archaeological research suggests that some of the earliest stone mounds were constructed as early as around 2,500 years ago. Excavations conducted at a number of megalithic sites in the Kelabit Highlands have also found an array of artefacts such as cremated bones, stone and glass beads, local earthenware and trade ceramics, and metal objects belonging to different time periods between 2,000 and a few hundred years ago. Among the Kelabit, megalithic practices were observed until around 1950, when the tradition ceased owing to modernisation and the people’s conversion to Christianity. Traditionally, megaliths were built during irau (‘feast’) as part of elaborate funerary rites of elite members of the Kelabit society. The batuh nangan and the lungun batuh, for example, were burial monuments where the bones of the deceased were placed in a secondary burial event known as burak nulang. The batuh senuped, on the other hand, commemorated the deceased or marked the location of the grave. The perupun, besides functioning as memorials, are also said to be the final repositories for the valuable properties (beads, gongs and jars) of heirless elites.

Source: Kuching In & Out | Documenting Our Culture, Food & Lifestyle – MEGALITHS OF THE KELABIT HIGHLANDS

The most influential books on Southeast Asian Archaeology (a crowdsourced list)

5 Comments

Jump to the list

This list about the most influential books on Southeast Asian archaeology originated with a paper I am preparing for the conference on Decolonising Southeast Asia’s Past. Very simply put, I am trying to understand if there is a difference in archaeological sources in English, compared to what is written in a non-English language (eg. Thai, Myanma, Bahasa). Part of this work was inspired by my experiences with rock art and the difference between what was written in English and what I could find in other languages. For example, the 2001 Handbook of Rock Art Research summarises Southeast Asia in three pages and mentions the presence of about 120 sites – of which only five are named. In contrast, my ongoing research has identified 1,200 sites (see here and here) by incorporating data from non-English sources and papers from less prominent journals. Perhaps once I have my thoughts sorted out I will share it in another post. To understand this disparity better, I put out an informal survey to ask about the most influential books about the archaeology of Southeast Asia:

 

Crowdsourcing the Most Influential Books on Southeats Asian Archaeology

Crowdsourcing the Most Influential Books on Southeast Asian Archaeology

 

This is by no means a scientific survey, but the majority of respondents in my network were archaeologists working in Southeast Asia. While it is not comprehensive, I think there is a good breadth of what is considered to be the  ‘classic’ books on Southeast Asian archaeology. A few books were recommended more than once (notably Southeast Asia from Prehistory to History by Bellwood and Glover).

 

This list is organised by region, then country (Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam) and then by thematic subject. Some suggestions that were not directly relevant to Southeast Asia were omitted. I’ve also included links to Amazon and/or the publisher if they are available for purchase (Disclosure: I make a commission if you buy the books through the Amazon links below). I’ll update this list regularly, so if you have a suggestion for other books leave a comment below.

 


Read More

Categories: Books

Call for Papers: Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies

No Comments

A conference on Lao studies will be held next year in Thammasat University in Bangkok. It has a fairly wide range of topics of interest. but several that might be of interest to archaeologists. Call for papers is open from now until end of October.

Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies: Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context
Venue: Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand
Date: 8-10 July 2015

The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University and the Center for Lao Studies (CLS) are pleased to announce that the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies (ICLS V) will be held from July 8 to 10, 2016 on the Tha Phrachan campus in Bangkok, Thailand. The main objective of the conference is to promote Lao studies, broadly defined, by providing an international forum for scholars to present and discuss various aspects of Lao Studies.

Theme
The theme of the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies is “Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context,” with particular (though not exclusive) emphasis on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

All Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states have committed to creating a region which is highly competitive, equitable in economic development and fully integrated into the global economy. The establishment of the AEC in 2015 will bring enormous opportunities as well as great challenges for the individual member countries in the region, especially for Lao PDR .

Suggested topics for the Fifth ICLS include, but are not limited to:

    The Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University and the Center for Lao Studies (CLS) are pleased to announce that the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies (ICLS V) will be held from July 8 to 10, 2016 on the Tha Phrachan campus in Bangkok, Thailand. The main objective of the conference is to promote Lao studies, broadly defined, by providing an international forum for scholars to present and discuss various aspects of Lao Studies.

Theme

The theme of the Fifth International Conference on Lao Studies is “Lao PDR in the ASEAN Context,” with particular (though not exclusive) emphasis on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

All Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states have committed to creating a region which is highly competitive, equitable in economic development and fully integrated into the global economy. The establishment of the AEC in 2015 will bring enormous opportunities as well as great challenges for the individual member countries in the region, especially for Lao PDR .

Suggested topics for the Fifth ICLS include, but are not limited to:

  • Laos’ trade integration within AEC
  • Special economic zones (SEZs)
  • Export survival
  • Roles of the private and public sectors
  • Human resources and effects on local employment
  • Migration
  • Infrastructure demands
  • Balancing development growth and environmental conservation
  • Tourism
  • Traditional knowledge and cultural expressions in economic development
  • Impacts on cultures and life ways
  • Lao language, culture, and history
  • Art, literature and music
  • Buddhism
  • Border Trade and culture
  •  Isan Regionalism
  • Architecture
  •  Education
  • Environment and Health
  • Rural Development
  • Other topics

The last potters of Vietnam

1 Comment
Jars of My Thien pottery village in Quang Ngai Province. Source: Viet Nam Net 20150323

A feature on the traditional potters of Vietnam, a dying craft, and their long lineage.

Jars of My Thien pottery village in Quang Ngai Province. Source: Viet Nam Net 20150323

Jars of My Thien pottery village in Quang Ngai Province. Source: Viet Nam Net 20150323

Walking down Vietnam’s pottery lane, before time erases its fame
Viet Nam Net, 23 March 2015

The last artisan of the ancient Quang Duc pottery line died early last year at 90, and the only artisan still making My Duc pottery is already in his 50s.

It is time to take a journey back in time to learn about the heyday of the pottery lines that earned national and regional fame for central Vietnam before they die out for good.

Many pottery villages prospered in south central Vietnam thousands of years ago, but the most famous ones were My Thien in Quang Ngai Province, Quang Duc in Phu Yen and Go Sanh in Binh Dinh.

Pottery relics from the villages are evidence of strong cultural interaction and trade between countries in the region centuries ago.

Full story here.

Categories: Ceramics Vietnam

China’s maritime silk road World Heritage Site proposal includes disputed areas

No Comments

China’s increasing presence in the South China Sea has been worrying for Southeast Asia and underwater archaeology has played a role in strengthening China’s claim over the sea, over equally legitimate claims by countries like Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. China’s is aiming to list the maritime silk road as a World Heritage Site and one could interpret the inclusion of disputed sites as a way to strengthen her claim on territories. Something to keep an eye on in the future – since the maritime silk route was not exclusively used by China and was a truly international trade route that would make better sense with many countries sharing the site listing together.

China looks for UNESCO approval in disputed S China Sea waters
Xinhua, 13 July 2014
Read More

Sackler Gallery Convenes Advisory Group to Discuss "Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds" Exhibition

1 Comment

A press release from the Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution about the Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds exhibition which they were supposed to host next year, but put on hold because of outcries from some archaeologists and cultural heritage experts over the issues of exhibiting artefacts taken from a commercial salvage operation (See here). The exhibition was on display this year at the ArtScience Museum in Singapore, and is now in storage.

Sackler Gallery Convenes Advisory Group to Discuss “Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds” Exhibition
Media Release from the Sackler Gallery, 08 December 2011
Read More

Spirit of Majapahit sets sail to Japan

No Comments

The Spirit of Majapahit is another ship replica recreating the maritime trade routes from Southeast Asia. The ship, built in Madura, is a joint project between Japan and Indonesia. (Article is in Bahasa Indonesia, but I’ve added a link on Google Translate).

Spirit of Majapahit, the replica 13th Century Ship Made Craftsman Madura [Link no longer available]
JPNN, 06 July 2010
Translate here.
Read More