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Archaeology in Asia: Past Heritages in Contemporaneous Issues

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Readers in Bangkok may be interested in this seminar at the Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre.

Archaeology in Asia: Past Heritages in Contemporaneous Issues
Date: 4 Dec 2012
Time: 1:30 – 5:30 pm
Venue: Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre 2nd floor – Room 207, 20 Borromma-ratchachonni Road, Taling Chan, Bangkok

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Myanmar Archaeology Association

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Directing your attention to the Myanmar Archaeology Association website (which will be also linked in the Resources page).

Myanmar Archaeology Association was founded on December 11.2013 by the alumni group of Archaeology. Myanmar Archaeology Association become certified official association at 2017. It was oriented to proceed the archaeological research works, protection and preservation of cultural heritage, educational purpose of cultural heritage knowledge and to make chance for the public to be able to participate in cultural heritage issues. Myanmar Archaeology Association was decided to be exist to fill the gap between NGOs, concerning cultural heritage issues and governmental sector including the academic institutions such as universities and schools. It will continue to proceed for the archaeological researches, field works and to support the public awareness to get further knowledge about cultural heritage and cultural heritage management.

Check out the Myanmar Archaeology Association website here.

Call for Papers: Decolonising Southeast Asia’s Past: Archaeology, History of Art, and National Boundaries

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Call for Papers: Conference, “Decolonising Southeast Asia’s Past: Archaeology, History of Art, and National Boundaries,” 13-14 Sept 2018, at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University, Tha Prachan Campus, Bangkok. Abstracts due by 15 May.
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Abstract:
The construction of Southeast Asia’s past developed significantly from the nineteenth century, as a result of a search for the roots of the modern nation-state and Western colonial attempts to explain the history of colonized countries. History, Archaeology, and History of Art as disciplines therefore played an important role in this period. Today, these colonial productions are still being reproduced, although some earlier perspectives have been challenged by scholars for being based on a Western point of view.

This 2018 international conference aims to explore and reconsider Southeast Asia’s past from different perspectives, paradigms, and methodologies.
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This conference will be divided into 3 major panels:
1. Archaeology:
Major themes: post-colonial archaeology, decolonizing colonial archaeological knowledge, post-processual archaeology, and interpretative archaeology (hermeneutics)
Conveners: Dr. Rasmi Schoocongdej, Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University
Dr. Podjanok Kanjanajuntorn, Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology

2. History of Art:
Major themes: post-colonial art history, post-structuralism in history of art, gender, critical thinking and ancient art, contemporary art
Conveners: Prof. Dr. Ashley Thompson, SOAS, University of London
Udomluck Hoontrakul, PhD Candidate, SOAS, University of London

3. States and Borders:
Major themes: ethnic conflict and borders, knowledge without borders, the problem of state polity concepts in Southeast Asia, the problem of national borders in art history and archaeology
Conveners: Prof. Dr. Mandy Sadan, SOAS, University of London
Udomluck Hoontrakul, PhD Candidate, SOAS, University of London
Panel coordinator: Assist. Prof. Pipad Krajaejun, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University
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Target Participants:
This will be a fairly focused conference that aims to draw small but enthusiastic groups of scholars and researchers from a wide range of research interests on issues related to Southeast Asia. The target presenters and participants include:
– University lecturers and school teachers
– Researchers
– Non-affiliated academics
– Postgraduate students
– Government and Non-Governmental Organization officials
– General Public
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Call for Papers:
– An abstract of no more than 200 words, deadline 15th May 2018
– Submit to: decolonisingSEApast@gmail.com, AND https://goo.gl/forms/8YLmZcCSEza89NZN2
– Full papers of 3000 words, to be submitted by 31st October 2018
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Conference Format:
A typical conference with keynote papers (50 minutes + 10 minutes of questions/discussion = 1 hour) and parallel paper sessions (25 minutes + 5 minutes questions/discussion = 30 minutes).
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Conference Proceedings:
Presenters can submit their full papers to be selected for publication in the online, peer-reviewed conference proceedings.
Alternatively, papers can be submitted to peer-reviewed journals under supervision of the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Thammasat University such as the Journal of Liberal Arts (TCI Tier 1), the Journal of Language and Linguistics (TCI Tier 1), and the Journal of History.
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Registration and Fee:
Speakers: 1200 Thai Baht; Poster Presentations: 800 Thai Baht; Participants (including students): 500 Thai Baht [no fee distinction between Thai citizens and international presenters. Registration fees to be paid in CASH on the first day of the conference].
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Cultural Walk (Optional):
On Wednesday 12th September 2018, a cultural walk/sight-seeing will be organized to the Grand Palace or other tourist attractions in a walking distance from the conference venue. Bookings can be made on the Registration Form.
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Important dates/deadlines:
– Last day of abstract submission: 15th May 2018
– Notification of Acceptance: 31st May 2018
– Deadline for full paper submission: 31st October 2018
– Notification of Acceptance for publication on conference proceedings: 30th November 2018
– Proceedings Publication (online): 31st December 2018
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For further information, please send an email to
decolonisingSEApast@gmail.com, LATU2018@arts.tu.ac.th

Call for Papers: The Archaeology of Culture, Climate and Change: From Deep Prehistory to the Vietnam War in Tropical Southeast Asia

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This year’s Australian Archaeological Association Conference will be held in Cairns, Queensland with a focus on Archaeology in the Tropics. There are several sessions relevant to the archaeology of Southeast Asia, so I hope to see some of you there! Deadline for abstracts is 27 June.

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Australian Archaeological Association/Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology Joint Conference 2014
Culture, Climate, Change: Archaeology in the Tropics
1-3 December 2014
Cairns, Queensland

List of relevant sessions after the jump.
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Back issues of Asian Perspectives available online

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From a colleague, Professor Miriam Stark:

AsianPerspectives

Dear Colleagues,

We are working to make our East and Southeast Asian archaeological publications more accessible to colleagues in regions that lack subscriptions to electronic journals. To that end, the University of Hawai’i Press has worked with us to make digital files available of all available Asian Perspectives articles from 1957 to 2008.

Please access individual journal issues at this URL (be sure to click on the issue to open up the list of articles):

http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/14928

We are also developing an open-access source for early 20th century western scholarship on the art and archaeology of Southeast Asia, and have begun with sources on Indochina. The currently available resources trend heavily toward Aymonier, Marchal, Lunet de la Jonquiere, and Parmentier, but we intend to expand the list in the next 18 months to include many other publications whose copyright has now expired:

http://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/12264

Review: Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia

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Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation.
Heidi Tan (ed.) Singapore: Asian Civilisations Museum, 2012.
ISBN: 978-981-07-1109-2 (pbk.)
Reviewed by S. T. Foo

Marine Archaeology in Southeast Asia: Innovation and Adaptation is a collection of papers delivered at the Conference on Maritime Archaeology in June 2011. The conference, which was organized by the Asian Civilisations Museum in Singapore, was held in conjunction with the Marina Bay Sands’ ArtScience Museum’s exhibit of the Belitung shipwreck artifacts in “Shipwrecked: Tang Dynasty Treasures and Monsoon Winds.” The Belitung shipwreck exhibition, which was referenced in many chapters of the book, was intended for further exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in the Spring of 2012, but was later cancelled in December 2011 after some controversy (Trescott 2011, Smithsonian Institution 2012).
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Linkdump: Last month’s archaeology news

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Finally, I’m back! I’ll write a short post later about what I’ve been up to in the field (unless you’re my facebook friend already and seen all the pictures already!). After about six weeks away from the blog, I’ve been spending the last week just processing and backing up the data from my trip and sifting through the news feeds for stories I’ve missed. Here’s a roundup of stories for the time while I was away:

Cambodia

  • Phnom Penh Post, 30 April 2012: A brief firefight at Preah Vihear leaves one Cambodian soldier shot.
  • Science Codex, 09 May 2012: The discovery of a previously-unknown people living in the Cardamom mountains, contemporary to Angkor and evidenced by jar burials is announced.
  • The Times Live, 10 May 2012: Another story on the jar burial culture in the Cardamom mountains. [Link no longer active]
  • TR Weekly, 11 May 2012: Siem Reap sees a dramatic 45% increase in visitors during the first quarter of 2012. [Link no longer active]
  • DVXUser, 14 May 2012: Oh Angkor! is a minidocumentary by Gunther Machu using the quotes of historical travellers to the ancient city.
  • Phnom Penh Post, 25 May 2012: A rare piece that is not about Angkor – the Phnom Penh Municipality purchases a war relic found in the Mekong: a wing of a Cambodian aircraft from the 1960s.
  • New York Times, 01 June 2012: Cambodia is seeking the return of two statues from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • CNN.com, 07 June 2012: This editorial asks if Cambodian ‘blood antiquities’ should be returned.

Indonesia

  • Jakarta Post, 24 May 2012: The tomb of a South Sulawesi king, Sultan Hasanuddin, is found desecrated.
  • Jakarta Globe, 31 May 2012: A minister for Education and Culture raised awareness of the “pitiful” state of some of the country’s museums.

Malaysia

  • Mizzima, 27 April 2012: Italy and Myanmar to cooperate in the preservation of Bagan and Pyu sites. [Link no longer active]
  • New Straits Times, 10 May 2012: A feature on the prehistoric and other archaeological features of Perak. [Link no longer active]
  • Bernama, 04 June 2012: Archaeologists announce that the Sungei Batu site in Kedah may be one of the oldest civilizations in the surrounding region.
  • Borneo Post, 06 June 2012: The Ministry of Information and Culture announces their intention to rewrite the Sejarah Melayu (The Malay Annals or Geneaology of Malay Kings) into modern prose for increased accessibility

Myanmar

  • Myanmar Times, 30 April – 6 May 2012: Three Pyu sites will be proposed for inclusion into the World Heritage List by the Ministry of Information and Culture.
  • The Straits Times (via Jakarta Globe), 24 May 2012: A feature on historian Thant Myint U and the Rangoon Heritage Trust.
  • Myanmar Times, 04-10 June 2012: A recent conference on conservation strategy stressed the need for a conservation plan for the colonial-era buildings of Yangon.

Philippines

  • AFP, via Channel NewsAsia, 30 April 2012: As many as 50 of Philippines’ indigenous languages may become extinct in the next 20 years.
  • Philippine Information Agency, 02 May 2012: The World Heritage Committee issues a set of guidelines for the management of the Ifugao Rice Terraces.
  • The Philippne Star, 08 May 2012: A proposal to declare the Ille Cave in Palawan a heritage park. (See also here).
  • Philippine Information Agency, 28 May 2012: Archaeologists arrive in Butuan to resume excavations of a Balangay boat.
  • Inquirer, 29 May 2012: A speculation of whether World War II artefacts were unearthed during a public works project and illegally sold.
  • Minda News, 30 May 2012: Excavations of the 4th Balangay boat begins in Butuan.
  • Philippine Information Agency, 31 May 2012: The Ifugao Archaeological Project Field School opens. (You can read their ongoing exploits on the Field School blog here.)
  • Philippine Information Agency, 04 June 2012: National Museum Archaeologists working to excavate another Balangay Boat in Butuan have reported that they are 1/3 of the way complete.

Singapore

  • via the NSC Archaeology Unit, 09 May 2012: For those who missed it, Prof. John Miksic’s talk on Guerilla Archaeology in Singapore is now online here.

Sri Lanka

  • Daily News, 10 May 2012: Sri Lanka authorities report a steep rise in the theft and looting of sites.

Taiwan

Thailand

Vietnam

  • Viet Nam News, 07 May 2012: An update on the deteriorating Champa structures in Quang Nam Province. [Link no longer active]
  • Saigon Giai Phong, 09 May 2012: The Ho Citadel receives the title of World Cultural Heritage Site.
  • Vietnam Net Bridge, 13 May 2012: A feature on a priest at Ho Chi Minh City and his collection of lamps and books.
  • Vietnam News, 15 May 2012: A feature on the problems of improper restoration and conservation efforts in Vietnam. [Link no longer active]
  • Vietnam Net Bridge, 17 May 2012: A set of 14th century Buddhist woodblocks have been recognised as Unesco World Heritage.
  • Vietnam Net Bridge, 19 May 2012: An exhibition on Vietnam’s Maritime Cultural Heritage opens in Hanoi. [Link no longer active]
  • Viet Nam News, 22 May 2012: Archaeologist discover the remains of a water buffalo at the Nam Giao altar site. [Link no longer active]
  • Viet Nam News, 30 May 2012: Pre-1945 documents pertaining to the World Heritage Ho Citadel in Thanh Hoa Province are on display at the province library. [Link no longer active]
  • Viet Nam News, 30 May 2012: The Ta Vu Pavilion in the historic city of Hue will be restored later this year with the help of German conservationists. [Link no longer active]
  • Vietnam Net Bridge, 03 June 2012: A feature on the centuries old practice of ancestor worship, the Festival of the Hung Kings. [Link no longer active]
  • Viet Nam News, 05 June 2012: Archaeologist raise awareness for the need to better preserve the Nam Giao Altar site against landslides, especially in the upcoming rainy season. [Link no longer active]

Back issues of Asian Perspectives available online

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Thanks to funding by the University of Hawai’i Press, articles from Asian Perspectives, one of the leading journals in Asian and the Pacific archaeology will be available online and ready for download at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa Scholarspace. You will be able to search and download articles published from 1955 right up to 2008.

Asian Perspectives is the leading peer-reviewed archaeological journal devoted to the prehistory of Asia and the Pacific region. In addition to archaeology, it features articles and book reviews on ethnoarchaeology, palaeoanthropology, physical anthropology, and ethnography of interest and use to the prehistorian. International specialists contribute regional reports summarizing current research and fieldwork, and present topical reports of significant sites. Occasional special issues focus on single topics.

Read articles from Asian Perspectives here.

Indonesia culture minister issues apology for destruction of Majapahit remains

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The Indonesian minister for culture and tourism issues a public apology for the government’s role in destroying the buried features of the Majapahit buildings in Trowulan, East Java (see here and here). Against the advice of archaeologists and local groups, the government began construction of a ‘Majapahit Information Centre’, driving concrete pillars into the ground and destroying sections of ancient structures buried underground.

Indonesian minister of culture’s public apology for destruction of archaeological site
The Art Newspaper, 15 April 2009
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