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Ancient DNA Study Pokes Holes in Horse Domestication Theory

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via National Geographic News, 09 May 2018: Not directly related to Southeast Asia, but may have implications further down the road in relation to when horses first appear in the archaeological record.

A long-held theory on how horse domestication and language spread across Asia has been disrupted by a look at our genetic past.

Source: Ancient DNA Study Pokes Holes in Horse Domestication Theory

Live from ‘Sharing Our Archaeological Heritage’

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I’m writing from Johor Bahru, Malaysia, where sessions at the international archaeology seminar organised by the Association of Malaysian Archaeolgists are underway. Monday’s been pretty packed filled with session after session of presentations from the different parts of Southeast Asia – this seminar’s theme is ‘Sharing Our Archaeological Heritage’.


Keynote speech by Dr Stephen Oppenheimer

Yesterday’s sessions began with the keynote speech by Oxford’s Stephen Oppenheimer about Southeast Asia’s role in the various waves of human migration. Explaining from a genetic perspective, he suggested the strong genetic evidence for a single southern route (by hugging the coast via India) out of Africa into Southeast Asia and Asia some 80,000 years ago. In more recent times, he also suggested indigenous expansions of local populations within Southeast Asia instead of a single ‘out of Taiwan’ theory to explain human migration into Australia, New Zealand and Polynesia.

Other presentations that caught my ear today was Dr Rasmi Shoocongdej’s work in Northwestern Thailand – I had a nice chat with her during lunch about conducting my fieldwork surveys in Thailand next year and also received some advice from her. Of course, homo floresiensis had to pop up – and from Dr. Harry Widianto’s presentation. I heard why he didn’t consider the hobbit to be a new species. It seems to me that the divide on opinion is very much based on nationalistic lines – with the Indonesians very much denying that homo floresiensis is a new species.

Another day of presentations on Tuesday, and then on Wednesday, we go on an archaeological tour of Johor!

Cagayan de Oro update 2: Responses from archaeological team and city

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16 August 2007 (From the Cagayan de Oro City Information Office and The Inquirer) – There’s another side to Cagayan de Oro story, it seems. In another story about the Huluga Open Site, the archaeology team from the University of the Philippines who investigated the site in 2004 was criticised for producing a “mock report” when Cagayan de Oro City commissioned an investigation into the site. Published here is the offending article from the Philippine Inquirer, and responses by the University of the Philippines Archeology Studies Program and the Cagayan De Oro Historical and Cultural Commission.

Cagayan de Oro’s lost treasure

Statement of the Members of the University of the Philippines-Archaeological Studies Program, Cagayan de Oro Project

Statement of the Members of the Historical and Cultural Commission Cagayan de Oro City

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ISEAA Early Career Award – Call for nominations closing soon

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The second round of the Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology is closing on 1 December. The committee solicits nominations and selects recipients for the Early Career Award in Southeast Asian Archaeology. The committee selects a single peer-reviewed article or chapter published within five years of the lead author’s receipt of doctorate that exemplifies excellent application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data.

For more details, download the flyer here.

ISEAA award for early career Southeast Asian Archaeologists

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Nominations are being sought for an Early Career Research Award, open to recent PhD recipients in the field of Southeast Asian Archaeology. Deadline is 1 December 2015.

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The Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology is pleased to announce the establishment of the first international award in the discipline of Southeast Asian archaeology.

The ISEAA Early Career Award will be open to nominees who have defended their dissertations and received Ph.D. degrees within the five year period from August 31, 2010 to September 1, 2015. An award committee of distinguished scholars will select the awardee based on a single peer-reviewed article or chapter, published within five years of the lead author’s receipt of doctorate, that exemplifies excellent application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data.

Selection/Evaluation Criteria: Submitted material will be evaluated and ranked by committee members on factors including originality and quality of research and strengths of application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Both mainland (Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar [Burma], and Malay peninsula) and island (island Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, East Timor, Brunei, and Singapore) are included.

Who Is Eligible to Submit Nominations: Nominations may be made by any professional archaeologist who holds a PhD. Self-nominations of eligible candidates are strongly encouraged.

Nomination/Submission Materials Required: Nomination letters should be submitted by email to the committee chair and include a PDF of the article or chapter, a two-page letter that includes the lead author’s current address and a scholarly description of why the publication is an exemplary application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Only one publication per nominee will be accepted.

Full details of the award here.

Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology Early Career Award

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The Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology has just set up an award for early career archaeologists for exceptional application of archaeological theory in Southeast Asian Archaeology. Awards are valued at USD$1,000. The deadline for nominations is 1 December 2015. Self nominations are encouraged.

Institute of Southeast Asian Archaeology

Institute of Southeast Asian Archaeology

Who Is Eligible to Submit Nominations or Apply for Award: Nominations may be made by any professional archaeologist who holds a PhD. Self-nominations are strongly encouraged.

Nomination/Submission Materials Required: Nomination letters should be submitted by email to the committee chair and include a pdf of the article or chapter, a two-page letter that includes the lead author’s current address and a scholarly description of why the publication is an exemplary application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Only one publication per nominee will be accepted. Nominees must have defended their dissertations and received their Ph.D. degree within the five year period from August 31, 2010 to September 1, 2015.

Nomination/Submission Deadline: December 1, 2015

Selection or Evaluation Criteria: Submitted articles and chapters are evaluated and ranked by committee members on factors including originality and quality of research and strengths of application of current archaeological theory to Southeast Asian data. Both mainland (Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar [Burma], and Malay peninsula) and island (island Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, East Timor, Brunei, and Singapore) are included.

For full details of the award, go to the ISEAA page here.

 

Cambodian-Laos programme in humanities research

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Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

Project Manusastra capacity building aim to develop local humanities research sounds like an excellent initiative, but it makes me wonder if training programmes like these teach Southeast Asians to think like westerners rather than to develop a local theory of our own. Does anybody have any experiences in the differences between ‘western’ archaeological theory and how different Southeast Asian groups think about archaeology?

Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

Source: The Cambodia Daily 20140825

University Program Cultivates Local Researchers
The Cambodian Daily, 25 August 2014
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Kulen dig leaves archaeologists more convinced site was once palace of Angkor Empire’s first ruler

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via Phnom Penh Post, 09 April 2018:

An archaeological dig drawing to a close this week at Siem Reap’s Phnom Kulen has lent greater credence to the theory that it was the site of the royal palace of the Angkor Empire’s first ruler, Jayavarman II.

Source: Kulen dig leaves archaeologists more convinced site was once palace of Angkor Empire’s first ruler

Categories: Angkor Cambodia

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Gunung Padang excavators working out of questionable assumptions

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Gunung Padang site, Java. Source: Jakarta Globe 20141028

A controversial archaeological excavation is taking place at Gunung Padang, a megalith site in Java, where the investigators are looking for evidence for a lost civilisation. The problem is, they seem to be working on a number of questionable assumptions, and the article talks about one of them – the so-called Out of Sundaland hypothesis.

Gunung Padang site, Java. Source: Jakarta Globe 20141028

Gunung Padang site, Java. Source: Jakarta Globe 20141028

‘Out of Sundaland’ Assumption Disproved
Jakarta Globe, 28 October 2014
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