Luce Initiative on Southeast Asia Grants

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Impending grant opportunity from the Henry Luce Foundation. Formal calls or proposals are expected to be out later this year. For more details, please click on the link below.

The Henry Luce Foundation is pleased to announce our Directors’ approval in June 2018 of the Luce Initiative on Southeast Asia (LuceSEA). The central objective of LuceSEA is to strengthen the study of Southeast Asia in American higher education by providing resources for the creation of models, strategies and partnerships that not only bolster existing program structures but also take them in new directions.

LuceSEA is a multi-year grants competition designed to encourage innovation in Southeast Asian studies through support for

  • work in new and emerging areas of inquiry and the expansion of direct engagement with scholars and institutions in Southeast Asia;
  • collaborations and networks that link academic centers to each other and with partners outside academia; and
  • the enhancement of core scholarly infrastructure for teaching and research relevant to Southeast Asia.

Within American philanthropic circles, the Luce Foundation is unique in its longstanding support for Southeast Asian studies. It is an appropriate moment for the Foundation to reinvest in the field, to ensure that it remains vibrant and relevant.

Source: Luce Initiative on Southeast Asia

Resort plans put Jerejak heritage status in doubt

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via Free Malaysia Today, 22 July 2018: Jerejak Island in Penang, Malaysia is a former leper colony that was planned for nomination in Unesco World Heritage. This plan is now in question as the state government has okayed plans for a large luxury resort to be developed on the island.

Deputy tourism minister to write to Penang chief minister about plans for luxury development on former leper colony island.

Source: Resort plans put Jerejak heritage status in doubt

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[Obituary] Pierre-André Lablaude, member of the ad hoc Group of Experts for the ICC-Angkor

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Conveying the sad news of the passing of Prof. Pierre-André Lablaude, who was part of the Group of Experts advising the Angkor International Coordinating Committee.

Cet architecte en chef des Bâtiments de France avait aussi participé à la rénovation complète des parterres de Le Nôtre au Parc de Sceaux.

Source: Décès de Pierre-André Lablaude, responsable du parc du Château de Versailles

The Southeast Asian Ceramic Society is looking for old publications

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on behalf of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society:

A writing of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society’s history has revealed that they are missing copies of a number of their earlier publications including:

Transactions of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society, no. 1 (November 1971). | Cook, George C. ”Notes on the Southeast Asian Ceramics Exhibition of 1971”

 Transactions of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society, no. 3 (1972). | Brown, Roxanna M. “Ceramic Excavations in the Philippines”, 3 pages.

 Transactions of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society, no. 4 (1974). | Gluckman, Michael. “A Visit to the Phan Kilns in Northern Thailand”

 Transactions of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society, no. 5 (1974). | Brown, Roxanna M. “The History of Ceramic Finds in Sulawesi: A Talk given by Roxanna Brown at the 36th meeting of the Southeast Ceramic Society, June 12th, 1974.

 Transactions of the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society, no. 6 (19??). | “Research into the Disposition of Ceramic Sites in North Sumatra” (Note: very hard-to-find)

If anyone has a copy, can you please let the President (Patricia Welch) know at: pbjwelch@gmail.com, as she would very much like to have a scanned copy for their permanent files.

CFP: Conference-cum-Workshop on History, Science and Technology of Ancient Indian Glass

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More details in the website link below. Deadline for applications: 30 September 2018.

The study of Ancient Indian Glass, involves scientific investigations as well as understanding in the right cultural perspective. A combination of such a strategy has not evolved fully in south Asia even though a larger history and ethnography of glass is noticed here. Further, there is a need of standardization of glass artifacts studies in terms of typology and technology among the various researchers.

Keeping in view of above objectives, Archaeological Sciences Centre, IITGN will be conducting a five day (including one day fieldtrip) Conference-cum-Workshop on ‘History, Science and Technology of Ancient Indian Glass’ from 21—25th January, 2019. This Conference-cum-Workshop aims to discuss the development of glass through the ages, literature/epigraphical references, typology, techniques and archaeometry involved in their study to interpret the past technology with the help of experts and scholars who are either archaeologists or scientists working in archaeology and allied disciplines.

Eminent scholars from around the world (Shinu Abraham, Ivana Angelini, Ravindra Singh Bisht, Wijerathne Bohingamuwa, Sharmi Chakraborty, Kurush Dalal, Laure Dussubieux, Thomas Fenn, Maninder Singh Gill, Viswas Gogte, Bernard Gratuze, Sunil Gupta, Asma Ibrahim, Alok Kumar Kanungo, Jonathan M. Kenoyer, Jan Kock, Stephen Koob, Joanna Then-Obłuska, Thilo Rehren, V. Selvakumar, Ravindra Nath Singh, Torben Sode, Massimo Vidale and Bhuvan Vikrama), and craftsmen from Varanasi/Purdalpur and Kapadwanj will be the resource persons who will share their work and deliver lectures and carryout hands-on experiments for the participants on various aspects of ancient glass in the archaeological context. With pre-designed requested paper from the experts a book on Glass of South & South-East Asia: Archaeology, Ethnography and Global Connections will be published.

Source: Conference-cum-Workshop on History, Science and Technology of Ancient Indian Glass

[Paper] New dates on dingo bones from Madura Cave provide oldest firm evidence for arrival of the species in Australia

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First direct dates of dingo bones from a site in Western Australia. Dingoes are one of the few mammals that crossed water (most likely accompanying humans) before European arrival. The dates and location of the site suggest that dingoes spread throughout the continent relatively quickly after their introduction.

New dates on dingo bones from Madura Cave provide oldest firm evidence for arrival of the species in Australia
Balme et al.
Scientific Reports
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-28324-x

The dingo is the only placental land mammal aside from murids and bats to have made the water crossings to reach Australia prior to European arrival. It is thought that they arrived as a commensal animal with people, some time in the mid Holocene. However, the timing of their arrival is still a subject of major debate with published age estimates varying widely. This is largely because the age estimates for dingo arrival are based on archaeological deposit dates and genetic divergence estimates, rather than on the dingo bones themselves. Currently, estimates vary from between 5000–4000 years ago, for finds from archaeological contexts, and as much as 18,000 based on DNA age estimates. The timing of dingo arrival is important as post arrival they transformed Indigenous societies across mainland Australia and have been implicated in the extinction of a number of animals including the Tasmanian tiger. Here we present the results of direct dating of dingo bones from their oldest known archaeological context, Madura Cave on the Nullarbor Plain. These dates demonstrate that dingoes were in southern Australia by between 3348 and 3081 years ago. We suggest that following their introduction the dingo may have spread extremely rapidly throughout mainland Australia.

Source: New dates on dingo bones from Madura Cave provide oldest firm evidence for arrival of the species in Australia | Nature Scientific Reports

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The little-known history of Cambodia’s ‘dark age’

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via SEA Globe, 18 July 2018:

While Cambodia is synonymous with the famous temple complex Angkor Wat, the post-Angkorian period is far less studied. Considered to be a dark time in the Kingdom’s history, an ongoing excavation at the country’s former capital city Longvek – now just a small village – offers evidence to suggest otherwise

Source: The little-known history of Cambodia’s ‘dark age’ – Southeast Asia Globe Magazine

Categories: Cambodia

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