Singapore student makes rare find in Cambodia

via Straits Times, 28 August 2017: A Singaporean spin on the recent, very successful, A+, ISEAS field school at Tonle Sngout.

Singapore student makes rare find in Cambodia

Source: Singapore student makes rare find in Cambodia, Singapore News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

Angkor demolitions – Local Authorities ‘Cheated’ Angkor Villagers, Official Says

via Cambodia Daily, 25 August 2017:

A provincial official has acknowledged for the first time that local authorities took money from villagers to allow constructions inside Angkor Archaeological Park, but said on Thursday that the illegal structures would still be demolished.

Deputy Siem Reap provincial governor Ly Samrith said that some villagers had been “cheated” by local officials, but only those who had submitted forms to the Apsara Authority asking for permission would be spared from the weekslong demolition operation that began earlier this month.

“We think that some constructions would be allowed to stay, but if we give them a pardon, they will extend their constructions to the front of the Angkor temple,” he said.

Source: Local Authorities ‘Cheated’ Angkor Villagers, Official Says | Cambodia Daily

Mahakan Fort found to be subsiding

via Bangkok Post, 24 August 2017: The Mahakorn Fort, which has recently been in the news because off attempts by the municipal government to evict the local community, is in the news again. This time, the fort structure itself appears to be tilting from old age.

Major repairs are planned for the ageing Mahakan Fort at the end of this year after city officials discovered during routine renovation that it is subsiding.

Source: Mahakan Fort found to be subsiding | Bangkok Post: lifestyle

Stupefied by stupa work

via Bangkok Post, 24 August 2017: An editorial about the Wat Arun restoration, that has drawn criticism of the Thai Fine Arts Department.

The public has been in uproar for more than a week over the restoration of stupas at the iconic Temple of Dawn, a national heritage and landmark tourist destination of the capital.

Source: Stupefied by stupa work | Bangkok Post: opinion

Borobudur Tourism Authority Board holds second coordinating meeting

via Jakarta Post, 22 August 2017:

Borobudur Tourism Authority Board holds second coordinating meeting

The second coordinating meeting of Borobudur Tourism Authority Board (BOB) was recently held on August 22.

The meeting was led by Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs of Indonesia Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan and attended by Tourism Minister Arief Yahya, Minister of National Development Planning Bambang Brodjonegoro and Minister of Administrative and Bureaucratic Reform Asman Abnur.

The establishment of BOB is based on the Presidential Regulation No. 46 of 2017 that was signed by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo on April 11. The board was officially launched in July

Source: Borobudur Tourism Authority Board holds second coordinating meeting – News – The Jakarta Post

One year after earthquake, Bagan temples see three more years before full recovery

via The Irrawady, 22 August 2017:

Myanmar aims to finish renovation work for quake-affected Bagan temples in the country’s central region by 2020, according to an official from the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library.

Thursday will mark one year since the powerful 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck central Myanmar on Aug. 24, centered about 15 miles west of Chauk in Magwe Region.

Out of the 3,252 temples and pagodas across Bagan—located to the north of the epicenter—389 were affected by the tremors and needed renovation, according to the department’s inventory.

Source: Myanmar to Repair Earthquake-Hit Bagan by 2020

‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle

via Sydney Morning Herald, 20 August 2017: An interview with Dr Kira Westaway from the University of Wollonggong and the events leading to the paper about finding 65,000 year old human remains in Sumatra.

The discovery by Australian scientist Kira Westaway took treks through Indonesian rainforest, a dogged refusal to take no for an answer, and a fax machine.

Source: ‘We’ve found the missing 20,000 years’: crucial piece in human migration puzzle

New Dawn or Letdown? Iconic Temple Makeover Gets Mixed Reviews (Photos)

via Khaosod English, 19 August 2017: Another discussion of the restoration of Wat Arun in Bangkok, which is receiving mixed reactions. The Fine Arts Department maintains it is following the established guidelines for the restoration of such work, but visitors today complain it is too white and bright than the grey tower they are used to seeing.

BANGKOK — Nopparat Petchchai has watched over the Temple of Dawn for over two decades. The 50-year-old security guard from Uttaradit province, who keeps a close eye on the throngs of mostly Western tourists, said he’s heard the years-long restoration effort of one of Thailand’s most iconic landmarks became controversial once the public got a […]

Source: New Dawn or Letdown? Iconic Temple Makeover Gets Mixed Reviews (Photos)

Airborne LiDAR prospection at Lovea, an Iron Age moated settlement in central Cambodia

Besides the paper on stone tools of Vietnam, another paper (also by other former colleagues at the Australian National University) presents Lidar data from the iron-age settlement of Lovea in Cambodia.

Recent archaeological investigations and technological applications have increased our appreciation of the intricacies of pre-Angkorian societal development. The results reveal a transformative period characterised by increasing socio-political complexity, exchange and technological transfer, differences in burial wealth, growing levels of conflict and variation in site morphology. Among the excavated Iron Age sites in Cambodia, Lovea, near the heart of Angkor, is well placed to provide a greater understanding of these changes in this region. Excavation and remote sensing confirm that the two moats surrounding Lovea are testimony to the early adoption of water-management strategies. These strategies grew in complexity, culminating in the vast network of canals, reservoirs and tanks that are the hallmarks of the hydraulic society of Angkor.

Source: Airborne LiDAR prospection at Lovea, an Iron Age moated settlement in central Cambodia | Antiquity | Cambridge Core