Bangkok’s inner city

Wat Ratchanaddaram Worawihan in Bangkok, built in 1846. Source: Bangkok Post 20151029

A feature from the Bangkok Post discussing some of the notable temples and structures in the historic core of Bangkok, emanating from the Grand Palace.

Wat Ratchanaddaram Worawihan in Bangkok, built in 1846. Source: Bangkok Post 20151029
Wat Ratchanaddaram Worawihan in Bangkok, built in 1846. Source: Bangkok Post 20151029

The heart of our city
Bangkok Post, 29 October 2015

The east bank of the Chao Phraya River where the history of Bangkok began is called Koh Rattanakosin because it is land surrounded by water and looks like an island. Its west side is adjacent to the river and the east end is the Khlong Khumuang Doem Canal. King Rama I, the first monarch of the Chakri Dynasty, established Bangkok on the east bank of the Chao Phraya River in 1782 as the new capital.

The digging of the city moat led to three stages of Bangkok’s urban expansion. The first tier of the city moat is the Khlong Khu Muang Doem that borders the innermost area of Bangkok. Built during the Thon Buri period, the canal starts at the foot of the Phra Pinklao Bridge, circles eastward and joins the Chao Phraya River again at Pak Khlong Talat.

The second tier of the city moat is the Khlong Rob Krung Canal, built in 1783. Two canals linking the Thon Buri period’s city moat to the Khlong Rob Krung behind Wat Ratchanaddaram and Wat Ratchabophit are called Khlong Lot (straight tubular canals) because of their shape. The third tier of the city moat is the Phadung Krung Kasem Canal. Dug during the reign of King Rama IV, it runs southwards from its north end near Thewet Market and ends at Si Phraya Pier.

Full story here.

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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