The Jar Burials of the Cardamom Mountains

Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911

The Royal Society of New Zealand has a feature and photo gallery on Dr Nancy Beavan’s (disclosure, friend of mine) work at the Cardamom Mountains, where she investigated a series of jar burials contemporaneous with Angkor.

Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911
Chhueng Kan and Tep Sokha working on the jar burial ledge, Phnom Khnang Peurng. Source: The Royal Society of New Zealand 20150911

In the Shadow of Angkor…
The Royal Society of New Zealand, 11 September 2015

The Highland Jar Burial site of Phnom Khnang Peung is the most extensive example of the unique Highland burial ritual that is being studied by Dr. Nancy Beavan from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, University of Otago, School of Medical Sciences with a 2013 Marsden Fund award. The 40+ Ayutthaya-sourced Mae Nam Noi burial jars – possibly obtained via previously unsuspected trade connections with nautical traders in the Gulf of Thailand – held a total of up to 152 individuals, representing the largest corpus of skeletal remains of any of the 10 known Jar Burial sites that have been discovered in the eastern ranges of the Cardamom Mountains of Cambodia.

Full story here.

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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