India's replica Angkor Wat, not just bigger, but much bigger

Some more news about the Bihar Angkor Wat that will probably unsettle many Cambodians, the Bihar Mahavir Mandir Trust, which is overseeing the project announced that the temple will be increased from 222 feet at the sides to 360 feet!

Bihar’s Angkor Wat temple to be have largest spire too
PTI, via IBN Live, 27 March 2012
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Sarawak sets up special budget to preserve relics from war

The state of Sarawak is setting up a special budget to help document the relics and history of World War II in the state, particularly in the interior where access can be a problem. However, the article makes it sound as if the senior citizens are the ones being called the relics!

Special budget to recover, preserve war relics in Sarawak
Borneo Post, 26 March 2012

Promoting World War II relics as state’s tourism product in the offing — Liwan
Borneo Post, 27 March 2012

Ministry to fund efforts to discover and preserve state’s wartime relics
The Star, 27 March 2012
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Old shadow play puppets returned to Thailand

An American couple have donated a set of shadow play puppet skins to Thailand, thought to be at least 100 years old.

Shadow play skins, The Nation 20120327
Shadow play skins, The Nation 20120327

Shadow play treasures return to Thailand
The Nation, 27 March 2012
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German murder mystery set in Angkor

German crime series ‘Tourists in Danger’ is currently filming an episode in Angkor, with the Bayon and Ta Nei as backdrops.

Filming Tourists in Danger at Angkor, Phnom Penh Post 20120323
Filming Tourists in Danger at Angkor, Phnom Penh Post 20120323

German ‘Tourists in Danger’ at Angkor
Phnom Penh Post, 23 March 2012
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Lecture: Pots and How They Are Made in Southeast Asia

If you missed it the first time around, Dr Leedom Lefferts will be presenting Louise Cort’s and his joint paper about the production of ceramics in mainland Southeast Asia in the middle of next month at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore.

Pots and How They Are Made in Southeast Asia
Dr Leedom Lefferts
Senior Research Fellow, Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore
Date: Friday, 13 April 2012
Time: 4.00 pm – 5.30 pm
Venue: ISEAS Seminar Room II
Registration: Email betty@iseas.edu.sg

A museum for inscribed stones

The Terengganu state government announces plans to build a museum to house inscribed stones, the most famous of which contains 700-year-old Jawi script. (Thanks to Liz Price for the news)

Terengganu Inscribed Stone, The Sun 20120326
Terengganu Inscribed Stone, The Sun 20120326

Trengganu to build RM20m ‘Batu Bersurat’ museum
The Sun, 26 March 2012
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William Willetts Lecture 2012: Art of Angkor: Monuments and their Dating

Readers in Singapore may be interested in this upcoming lecture at the National Library, held in conjunction with the Southeast Asian Ceramic Society AGM.

SEACS 43rd AGM & William Willetts Lecture 2012 [Link no longer active]
Time: 6.45pm
Date: Friday, 30 March 2012
Venue: The POD, Level 16, National Library Board, Victoria Street

his year’s lecture, tentatively entitled “Art of Angkor: Monuments and their Dating”, will be given by Prof. Kwa Chong Guan, author of the book, 700 years of Singapore History.

The lecture begins with William Willetts’ interest in Angkor monuments. The lecture proceeds to discuss the challenges of dating the Angkor monuments and how the art historian Philip Stern developed a “method” of attempting it in the late 1920’s, which later influenced a whole generation of French scholars – P Dupont, J Bosselier, M Bernstein, among others – down to today. The talk will broadly cover the wider issue of dating art by its style and not get too technical on art history methodologies and Angkor art.

Summary of lecture
The lecture begins with William Willetts’ interest in Angkor monuments. The lecture proceeds to discuss the challenges of dating the Angkor monuments and how the art historian Philip Stern developed a “method” of attempting it in the late 1920’s, which later influenced a whole generation of French scholars – P. Dupont, J. Bosselier, M. Bernstein, among others – down to today. The talk will broadly cover the wider issue of dating art by its style and not get too technical on art history methodologies and Angkor art. A more developed lecture will be delivered to archaeology students of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre’s Archaeological Unit who are currently doing a field trip in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Australia's million-dollar donation to Cambodia

Foreign minister Bob Carr announces a donation of a million dollars to help with the maintenance of Angkor as part of his visit to the region.

Australia to give $1 million to Angkor temples
ABC News, 26 March 2012
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Seminar: Maritime History and Archaeology: What can these subjects reveal? A Philippine Case Study

Readers in Perth may be interested in this seminar held at the University of Western Australia.

Maritime History and Archaeology: What can these subjects reveal? A Philippine Case Study
Jennifer Craig, Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology, University of Oxford
When: 3-4pm, Thursday 29 March
Where: University of Western Australia, Social Sciences Lecture Room 1 (G28)

What is meant by ‘maritime’ archaeology and history? What materials might someone conducting this line of research consider? ‘Maritime’ in this sense points to research and analysis conducted on material culture with a view from sea to land. The Philippines is an archipelago of over 7000 islands and is geographically located at the nexus of two great seas – the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Multiple cultural groups lived on the land and waters of the archipelago for millennia. This work is focused on the Historical Period (10th to 19th centuries).

Jennifer Craig has developed two research projects on how to analyse maritime material culture available on the cultural groups, the ideas are complimentary but separate. One will investigate past sailors’ cognitive awareness of space and initial findings of common elements between different cultural groups’ navigation tools. The second project involves the typological analysis of beads archaeologically recovered from shipwrecks of the Philippine waters dated intermittently across the Historic Period. This presentation will also share information on the resources available at the University of Oxford, the meaning of keywords, and an overview of the Ms Craig’s current research.

Conference discusses restoration and management of heritage sites

A recent conference (the article doesn’t mention its name) talks about mismanagement in the restoration and running of heritage sites.

Tay Phuong Pagoda, Viet Nam News 20120324
Tay Phuong Pagoda, Viet Nam News 20120324

Clumsy restorations harm heritage sites [Link no longer active]
Viet Nam News, 24 March 2012
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