Ayutthaya flood aftermath

More stories from the aftermath of this year’s floods which have directly affected the world heritage site of Ayutthaya.

Remnants of Buddhist Monastary in Ayutthaya Thailand
photo credit: jwvgoethe

Ayutthaya picks up the pieces as floodwaters recede [Link no longer active]
Monsters and Critics, 10 November 2011

Ayutthaya, after the floods
Bangkok Post, 17 November 2011

Fears for ancient Thai temples as floods recede [Link no longer active]
AFP, 20 November 2011

Excerpt from Bangkok Post:

While the governor waits for the post-flood recovery budget that was approved by the Cabinet, he outlined the expected time frame for repairing basic infrastructure and helping flood victims, in which each flood-hit household will initially receive 5,000 baht in compensation, as well as making sure the five industrial estates will be able to resume operations next month. “I will do everything in my power to ensure that at the very least a couple of factories in each industrial estate will be able to resume operations on December 16, and that the rice fields will be ready for planting by January,” he said.

As for the tourist attractions, the province has teamed up with local companies and the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) to encourage people to help restore various sites, mostly old temples, under a massive clean-up campaign called ”We Care for Ayutthaya”, as well as reviving visitor confidence.The campaign kicked off on November 10 at Wat Yai Chai Mongkhol, where 300 volunteers from Bangkok and local residents armed with brushes, brooms, shovels and hoses helped to remove the dirt and debris remaining in the temple grounds and on different Buddha images.

The TAT has also prepared a list of 500 religion-related places, including Thai temples, 41 churches, 61 masjids and 45 Chinese shrines, for those who wish to participate in the big clean-up activity.

Full stories here and here.

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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