New archaeological discoveries in North Vietnam

Archaeologists working in north Vietnam report the discovery of two prehistoric cave sites and the remains of seaports from the Tran and Le Dynasties.

Prehistoric relics discovered in North
Viet Nam News, 09 November 2010

Vestiges of prehistoric human settlements and two historic seaports have been discovered by archeologists in Bai Tu Long Bay in the northern province of Quang Ninh.

Traces of prehistoric peoples have been found at Ang Gia Cave in Thang Loi Commune and at Hoi Cave in Ban Sen Commune, including stone tools and fossilised remnants of burned wood, animal bones, and a large number of shells of Melania (a kind of freshwater snail) and of Cyclophorus (mountain snail).

Two stone tools were also recovered from the bottom of a stream, suggesting they were left in the process of tool-making.

Many of the shells of the freshwater snails show evidence of having their ends broken to extract the meat, said Prof Trinh Nang Chung, head of the excavating team.

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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