Mesolithic cave site found in Sumatra

A cave site used for residence in the mesolithic has been discovered in North Sumatra containing stone tools and palm murals.

Mesolithic cave discovered in Pagaralam
Antara, 26 April 2010

A Mesolithic cave was discovered by the residents in Talang Kubangan Hamlet, South Dempo sub-district, North Sumatra.

The three-storey cave located on a hilly and deep a forest has two entrances and seven rooms and also showed some human footprints.

Due to natural causes of rock sedimentations, the cave`s rooms are narrowing and covering some of the cave`s ancient hand palm murals.

The local residents actually have acknowledged this cave for a long time known as the “Rie Tebing” cave from the urban hereditary myth, where a hermit had stayed and formed the cave, a Talang Kubangan community leader, Manto.

The cave itself is impossibly formed naturally, because the surrounding area has different types of rocks from the one in the cave, then it must be man-made cave, especially after seeing the neatly carved stone bed in one of the rooms, Manto said.


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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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