Wednesday Rojak #64 – The stolen and fading traditions edition

This week’s rojak features the dying tradition of gong tuning in Vietnam, and a case of stolen tradition in a spat between Indonesia and Malaysia. And a special treat for those who missed the Hobbit Symposium earlier this year.
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photo credit: roktobaren

  • Gong tuning is a fine art in Vietnam, especially since there are only a handful of people left who are able to teach the gongs how to sing [Link no longer active].
  • Where’s the most spectacular place for an Angkoran ruin? Consider Wat Phu Champasak in Laos.
  • Malaysia’s gone and done it again – for this year’s tourism campaign, they seem to have stolen a traditional Balinese dance in an attempt to pass it off as their own.
  • And for people like me who weren’t able to make it to Stony Brook for the Hobbit symposium, fear not! Videos of the sessions have been posted online here.

In this series of occasional rojaks (published on Wednesdays) I feature other sites in the blogosphere that are related to archaeology in Southeast Asia. Got a recommendation for the next Wednesday rojak? Email me!

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

One thought on “Wednesday Rojak #64 – The stolen and fading traditions edition”

  1. “Malaysia’s gone and done it again – for this year’s tourism campaign, they seem to have stolen a traditional Balinese dance in an attempt to pass it off as their own.”

    You would think that Malaysia has enough culture of it’s own to promote, without having to do so? But of course, tourists like dancing pretty girls… -sighs-

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