Vietnamese highlands yield 3000-year-old artefacts

Archaeologists have recovered a large amount of 3000-year-old material from a site in the central highlands, leading them to believe that an important commerical centre once existed there.

22 July 2007 (Viet Nam News) – Archaeologists have recovered a large amount of 3000-year-old material from a site in the central highlands, leading them to believe that an important commericial centre once existed there.

Highlands discoveries may be three millennia old

Archaeologists have confirmed that artefacts found in Buon Rau village, Hoa Tien Commune, in Krong Pak (Dac Lac) are as much as 3,000 years old.

Local farmers first unearthed what they thought to be antique ceramics and stone tools in 2001 while planting coffee and pepper. They passed them to Dac Lac museum and archaeologists began excavating a 1.5ha site in Buon Rau in 2003.

Despite damage caused by farming, after 10 days of digging to a depth of 50cm an archaeological team led by Dr Tran Quy Thinh unearthed a number of ancient artefacts that led experts to declare the site one of the most valuable in the country.

Archaeologists have since unearthed thousands of items of pottery, stone tools, and four burial jars. Among the most valuable finds were a number of stone rectangular and trapezium-shaped axes, a grinding stone and jewellery.

Read the full story here.

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Author: Noel Tan

Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO-SPAFA, the Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaelogy and Fine Arts.

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