Paper: Seafaring Archaeology of the East Coast of India and Southeast Asia during the Early Historical Period

A new Open Access paper published in Ancient Asia:

The concept of trade in ancient India was quite different from modern times. In olden day’s mariners, artisans, traders, Buddhist monks and religious leaders used to set sail together and this trend continued till the advent of modern shipping. The representation of art on the walls of the caves, stupas and temples enlighten us regarding their joint ventures, experiences and problems faced during the sea voyages. The finding of varieties of pottery, punch marked and Roman coins, Brahmi and Kharoshti inscriptions along the ports, trade centres and Buddhist settlements suggest the role played by them in maritime trade during the early historical period and later. Mariners of India were aware of the monsoon wind and currents for more than two thousand years if not earlier. Furthermore, the study shows that the maritime contact with Southeast Asian countries was seasonal and no changes of Southwest and Northeast monsoon have been noticed since then. This paper details the types of pottery, beads, cargo found at ports, trade routes and Buddhist settlements along the east coast of India and the role of monsoons in maritime trade. The impact of Buddhism on trade and society of the region are also discussed.

Source: Seafaring Archaeology of the East Coast of India and Southeast Asia during the Early Historical Period (doi:10.5334/aa.118

Bombed and looted ancient Cambodian city poised for rebirth

via AFP, Yahoo.com:

It has survived centuries of monsoon rains, a US bombing campaign and rampant looting.

Now the ancient temple city of Sambor Prei Kuk in Cambodia is finally ready for a renaissance — and is teasing tourists to its forest-cocooned ruins.

Cloistered by trees and linked by winding dirt trails, the site has played second fiddle to its much bigger cousin to the west — Angkor Wat — Cambodia’s top tourist destination.

But in July it gained a listing by the UNESCO World Heritage, promising a tourist bonanza that could breathe new life into a once-thriving 6th and 7th century metropolis.

“We have already seen more and more local and foreign tourists flocking to visit our site,” said Hang Than, an official who manages the compound, as he strolled towards one of several temples spectacularly wrapped in tree roots.

Source: Bombed and looted ancient Cambodian city poised for rebirth

‘Illegal’ Angkor homes dismantled in Siem Reap

via Phnom Penh Post, 11 August 2018: The authorities have been warning for some time now about dismantling illegal structures in the Angkor Park.

Authorities in Siem Reap province yesterday began tearing down villagers’ homes they say are illegally constructed inside the Angkor Archaeological Park’s protected zones.

Source: ‘Illegal’ Angkor homes dismantled in Siem Reap, National, Phnom Penh Post

See also:

Authorities race to save more mural paintings in Bagan before heavy rains

via Myanmar Times, 10 August 2017:

Experts are rushing to restore more mural paintings in over 50 pagodas which were damaged by earthquake a year ago before heavy rains start next month, an officer from the archeology department in Bagan told The Myanmar Times.

Source: Authorities race to save more mural paintings in Bagan before heavy rains

Tonle Sngout excavation wraps up

via Cambodia Daily, 11 August 2017:

After 13 days of excavation that yielded artifacts beyond their dreams, archaeologists and researchers wrapped up work in Angkor Archaeological Park this week. After the excitement of their finds—which included a 1.9-meter statue of a guard and part of a Medicine Buddha—the team now have to get on with the job of assessing what they’ve found.

Source: After Incredible Finds, Angkor Archaeologists Wrap Up Dig – The Cambodia Daily

Cambodia, Myanmar discuss joint promotion of Angkor, Bagan

via Nikkei Asian Review, 05 August 2017:

Cambodia and Myanmar are looking for ways to promote jointly the ancient cities of Angkor and Bagan, two of the most important historical, religious, and archeological sites in Southeast Asia.

Tourism authorities and industry players from both countries have formed a working group that held its first meeting in Bagan in June to discuss joint promotion of the destinations, and airline and visa arrangements. A second meeting is planned for later in the year in Cambodia, and a bilateral agreement should be signed in 2018.

Source: Cambodia, Myanmar discuss joint promotion of Angkor, Bagan- Nikkei Asian Review

CFP: SEA Studies Symposium 2018

The 7th Annual Southeast Asian Studies Symposium will be held in March 2018 at Universitas Indonesia with the theme: “What is Southeast Asia? Exploring Uniqueness and Diversity”. Proposals for papers and sessions are due by October 15, 2017.

“What is Southeast Asia? Exploring Uniqueness and Diversity” 22–24 March 2018 at Universitas Indonesia in collaboration with School of Environmental Science, Universitas Indonesia Indonesia Environ…

Source: SEA Studies Symposium 2018 – Call for Panels and Papers | Project Southeast Asia

Kuala Lumpur’s heritage buildings under threat

via Straits Times, 08 August 2017:

SE Asia News -Misguided spending, poor maintenance and bad planning have left these icons in disrepair.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Source: Kuala Lumpur’s heritage buildings under threat, SE Asia News & Top Stories – The Straits Times